Confessions of an Extra Bucks Flusher

i will survive!I’m so ashamed to admit it, but I wasted my Extra Bucks last week. Thirteen dollars of them. It makes me cringe to think about it.  Especially since we had lost them, and when I logged in to my CVS account to retrieve them it told me I had already printed them and therefore they were unavailable.  After an email reminder weeks later though, I logged in again and found it would let me reprint them- I snatched them back from the edge of the expiration date.

I excitedly went into CVS the night before they expired, ready to use them on a $10 prescription, but realizing that Extra Bucks are a use it or lose it proposition, picked up a $3 bottle of baby wash so as not to waste a cent.  I read the fine print and didn’t see anything about not being able to use them on a prescription, and although I had an inkling it might not work, I tried it anyway.  As I suspected, the cashier said no dice on the prescription, so I took back my Bucks, paid for the baby wash, and left with plans to return the next day.

Well, as you can guess, I was too busy the next day to get back to CVS and those precious Extra Bucks dissolved into oblivion.  Now I had that baby wash I could have lived without and thirteen dollars of regret.

Clearly I need a better system to keep track of my Extra Bucks (and some other rebates I forget about until they expire- ugh).  But it made me think about how impossible it is to do things right financially all the time.  To hit all the sales, get all the coupons, snatch up the absolute best deal on that item on our shopping list (make sure you find the 20% off promo code and not the 15% off one), buy the stocks at the right price, and then sell them at the right price… we could continually beat ourselves up thinking how much more money we’d have if only we had done it all right.  But life’s not like that.  We win some and we lose some, and dwelling on the times we lose doesn’t accomplish anything.  It certainly doesn’t make us any wealthier and in fact can make us poorer by distracting us from learning from our missteps and doing better next time.  If you find yourself counting up all the money you could have had but don’t because you made what you see as the wrong financial decisions, turn it around and think of all the money you do have because you made some good choices.  Let the bad decisions go, take notes for next time, and remember even Babe Ruth only got a hit 35% of the time.

I’ve got to go now to figure out how to send my Extra Bucks to my CVS card so this doesn’t happen again.

 

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2 Responses to Confessions of an Extra Bucks Flusher

  1. Tina Myers March 2, 2013 at 11:13 am #

    I like this article because it is an illustration of being smart with your money but not intended to make us believe we need to achieve perfection… as that is an exercise in futulity and can be a waste of time and sanity if you allow yourself to focus on external events to control your spending. My experience with coupon use is with a recent dabbling into a new hobby to teach myself how to paint with watercolor. Never having been a painter/artist I had no tools or supplies to get started. A brief search of what I would need to create my little artist corner could have immediately bled hundreds of dollars out of me however, I decided to choose an incremental approach and get two items per week with the 40% off coupons provided by the weekly sales circular of the local craft stores. Surprisingly after about 10 weeks of careful shopping, I was able to gather enough materials to do my first painting. Do I have perfection? No, but I felt smart that I made it work with what I had and that gave me a big 🙂 .

    • Erin Baehr March 2, 2013 at 3:52 pm #

      Tina, that’s great shopping! I bet you are enjoying your painting even more knowing how resourceful you were.

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